"NAF is a critical resource in the community to help with the financial difficulties that many nonprofits face from time to time."

Sarah Clyne, Executive Director, Domestic Abuse Project

Domestic Abuse Project (DAP) focuses its attention and energy on developing systemic changes to help prevent domestic abuse. Founded in 1979, DAP partners with a number of organizations in the community and across the state in support of those who have experienced domestic abuse. DAP works with key partners to stop domestic violence, including shelters, law enforcement, criminal justice system, child welfare, and healthcare. In all of these situations, the partners refer clients across multiple programs to get them all the help they need.

Sarah Clyne, the executive director of DAP, said a difference between DAP and most other organizations working with those who have experienced domestic abuse, is DAP serves men, women and children – anyone affected by abuse. DAP offers group and individual counseling for every member of the family.  

Last year about this time, Sarah called Allie Wagstrom, the portfolio manager at Nonprofits Assistance Fund (NAF). Sarah was new to the Executive Director role at DAP, the organization had just had its second year with significant losses, and Sarah asked Allie if she help review the financial statements. Allie did that and more, pointing out some things Sarah should monitor, identifying things for the board to focus on, and developing cash flow and cash projections.

Then DAP experienced another financial set-back, so NAF was again contacted as a partner. “NAF provided us with a bridge loan. Sarah said. “They believed in us and could see that there were dollars that would be coming in, so the bridge loan really helped us through that most difficult time. We were behind on billing – we just needed to get those current. We needed to get internal financial stability, map out cash flow, and the loan helped with that stability.”

DAP has now added a line of credit from NAF to help with uneven cash flow. Sarah and her staff have taken advantage of other services offered by NAF, including workshops, webinars and support in the form of a quick question over the phone or a longer meeting to delve deeper into questions about DAP’s financial statements. 

Allie has high praise for DAP and Sarah. “What I love about DAP is it treats the whole cycle of domestic abuse with its whole-family counseling, and does not serve as a stop-gap for just part of the cycle.” Allie continues, “Sarah is one of the people within this sector who is so very thoughtful and knowledgeable. We made a loan to support a new vision of a new leader for the organization – we looked at how NAF could help DAP rethink its business model. We did, and DAP is meeting its mission and building capital reserves now.”

“Surpluses let you be innovative in programming and to plan for next year and to meet the next challenge,” Allie said, “and not just react to the current challenges.”

“NAF is a critical resource in the community to help with the financial difficulties that many nonprofits face from time to time,” Sarah said. “NAF is an incredibly flexible resource when financial stability and health are so critical to nonprofits.”

And the relationship continues. “Allie is coming to the next board meeting to offer training and support,” Sarah said.  The line of credit continues, DAP has talked about mortgage options with NAF, and Sarah said she will continue to look to NAF with its flexibility and capacity to help.

“If you have any questions about financials or need some insights, NAF is a terrific partner. It offers lots of training and resources for nonprofits – workshops, webinars, office hours,” Sarah said.

NAF is proud to partner with DAP through loans and trainings to support it in its mission to stop domestic violence one family at a time. You can find out more about Domestic Abuse Project here